Takamine B10

Re: Takamine B10

Postby kennans » Fri Dec 14, 2007 1:34 pm

I had one of these for a little while, enjoyed it, but eventually let it go. The problems I had - more 'disappointments', really - were that No.1: it didn't "feel" acoustic enough for me. The top is pretty thick, and it didn't have the open, airy acoustic feel I had hoped for. The second thing was a suspicion that the pre-amp, while being very high tech and innovative, was actually voiced for an acoustic guitar, and not a bass range instrument.

But, y'know, that's just me. "Old Dog" and whatnot.
kennans
Road Dog
 
Location: Bay Area

Re: Takamine B10

Postby Golem » Fri Dec 14, 2007 2:02 pm

kennans wrote:I had one of these for a little while, enjoyed it, but eventually let it go. The problems I had - more 'disappointments', really - were that No.1: it didn't "feel" acoustic enough for me. The top is pretty thick, and it didn't have the open, airy acoustic feel I had hoped for. The second thing was a suspicion that the pre-amp, while being very high tech and innovative, was actually voiced for an acoustic guitar, and not a bass range instrument.

But, y'know, that's just me. "Old Dog" and whatnot.
`

True the top is pretty stout, that may be why the sound thins out when I back off the adjusters in the tailpiece so that it's only body contact is thru the hinge pin. The tailpiece is not cut to allow a "straight pull" along the line of the string tension such as the way an URB tailpiece aligns itself. It's made to alway apply some downward force, thus increasing the break angle over the bridge. If you try to let it align itself with the string tension, the yoke carrying the hingpin interferes with the wooden tailpiece.

Natcherly I Dremeled the tailpiece to allow the wooden "trapeze" to self-align along the natural line of the strings [line from hingepin-to-bridge-saddles]. When I reinstalled it, the embedded allen screws were not contacting the brass plate under the trapeze. Just to see WTF those screws are about, I twirled them back into contact with the brass plate. That made the tone more "solid" than when the tail's only contact to the body was thru the hingepin. Sooprahz, sooprahz!!

I turned the allen screws only enuf to get solid contact. I didn't want to force the trapeze down closer the body like it was when I got it. So now I have a gentler break angle over the saddles. Me likey. I shim up the stoptails on my Warwicks to reduce the break angle. I tilt those Epi-Gibson 3-point bridges to minimize break angle as well. I even shim string trees on headstocks to reduce the break over the nut. All that "more tension equals more sustain" is just not for me. I don't hate sustain. Sustain is good. I just feel I'm usually getting more than too much of a good thing.

You may be quite right about the pre-amp, but I find that "acoustic guitar" voiced tronix are generally bassy enuf for bass. Frinstintz, to hear the true voice of a bass when trialing one in a shop, I'll often go into the acoustic guitar room and use the "acoustic combo". The only shortcoming I find with these amps is not in the voicing, it's just that the drivers can't take much from a real bass. But with the on-board pre there's no drivers to complain about, so I'm way cool with that. To me, "Acoustic" isn't about "open and airy", maybe cuz I don't play acoustic guitar. To me, it's about "deep hollow resonant" tone, I spoze cuz I play bass. I don't care about "rings like a bell" acoustics. I'm into "growls like a doghouse". If this ax sounded like a Martin D28, but an octave lower? I wouldn't own it. I don't wanna hear any geetar sounds from my bass.

Anything else you discovered about set-up and use I'd be glad to hear:

Whatcha think about the too-high nut slots?

Did you regroove the nut down to typical FL height, barely off of the FB ?

Did you deepen the bridge saddle groove to lower the action, or just play it way high like an URB ?

Ever try to put a strap on it ?

Ever try to put it in a cello case ?

TIA [now that you've stepped in it ... ]

`

New basses are red. Used basses are black.
- - ---- -- - --- - - - --- - ---- -- - - --- - -- - -

In a perfect world
At the end of the day
Tomorrow never comes.
User avatar
Golem
 

Re: Takamine B10

Postby radapaw » Fri Jan 04, 2008 9:21 am

I caught one of these being played on the tv a while back, I thought it was a great plugged in tone I was hearin'
radapaw
 

Re: Takamine B10 [Gig Report]

Postby Golem » Fri Jan 04, 2008 12:00 pm

`

OK I'm a week tardy on the gig report. Main delay was I wanted a fibreglass cello
case for it. Hadda reverse the 'A' and 'D' tuning machines for a good fit, but
otherwise it's really great fit. Looks like a blue alien space robot mummy case,
with wheels. The B10 is now referred to as "King Tut" :-) Oh yeah, and I put dots
on the edge of the FB at the 4th, 5th, and octave.

Even tho all the published info, and the inclusion of a serious endpin, and the
shear size of this ax, and its lack of strap buttons leaves one to believe that
it would be a nightmare on a strap, I put strap buttons on anyway, and it's great
on a strap. I initially added the buttons for on-the-lap playing cuz I wear a
strap on all my basses even when seated. And this one needed a "lap leash" more
than some others. But on New Year's Even the room was noisy and I hadda go closer
to Ms Diva's cab to hear her electric piano so WTF. I had it on a strap, so I got
off my chair and all was cool. I wouldn't wanna wear it like that for a four hour
standing up club date, but gimme a stool for about 50% of the time and let's rock.

Balance on the strap is quite good. I'm using a 4 inch wide slippery nylon strap
[think "seatbelt"] and I wouldn't swap for a grippy textured strap no way. I can
play near horizontal or near vertical at will, and a grippy strap would just be
a hinderance to shifting between the two. I thought the huge neck and head would
dive like a duck, but apparently the huge body more than compensates. I don't
know the total weight, but it's no worse than a metal neck Kramer, so a 50-50 mix
of sit-stand is no hardship. The control panel is on the forward curve, not in the
arm curve, so it's easy to play up on the neck without accidentally bumping into
the volume or other controls. I haven't played it on the endpin yet. I'm still
getting used to this monster. Also haven't figgered where to stash the endpin in
the cello case [a cello endpin stores inside the cello body].

Sound is a perfect complement to the electric grand piano, same way true URB sound
complements a real grand piano. It's as close to URB voicing as the electric grand
is to a real grand. IOW it does the job. It's got that cool air-wood-stringy thingy
going on, but you can get that from a slimline flattop. It's also got that thumpy
resonant "drone" and decay that even a Rob Allen MB can't deliver, and I've heard
several hours of RA MB in a yeoman hands, right up close. The B10 came with round
wounds and they had a better growl, but GHS Precision flats have a better hum.

I was mistaken about Acousticores being too short. They fit perfectly but after just
an hour of home practice I took them off and put the GHS back on. The Acousticores
had too much of a geetarish ringing brass bell voice. I've got Acousticores on two
solid bodies, fretted and FL, and had them on a thinline semihollow FL, and with
none of them was there an annoying brassy tone. Maybe it's the truly acoustic build
of the B10 that puts the brassy tone out front, or maybe it's the electronics, but
whatever does it, I don't like it. Ain't gonna play a monster like this just to
sound like a geetar. Can do that in 6 lbs on a Michael Kelly.

Speaking of size, the reach to the strings is not bad. The strings are about eight
inches ahead of where the back side rests against your body. One a monster flattop,
this would cause the edge of the box to cut off the blood flow in your right arm,
cuz the sides of the box would be 7.5 inches deep. With the archtop and arched back
and the tall bridge, these sides are only 4 inches, even tho the strings are eight
inches away from your body. So the edge of the box isn't cutting into your forearm
so much [it *is* in contact though], plus you're not using your forearm against the
edge of the box to fight neck dive, so that's more relief as well.

I was also mistaken about the EQ. There *is* a mid control and it is sweepable. It
takes on extra button to bring it up and until I downloaded the RTFM I had no clue.
There's also 10 preset EQ-and-reverb configs and 10 more that are user writeable.
Not to tricky to write and very easy to select. Coolth.

Long post. If you're still reading, get a life. Or a job Or get your own B10. If I didn't
mention something, just ask.

`

New basses are red. Used basses are black.
- - ---- -- - --- - - - --- - ---- -- - - --- - -- - -

In a perfect world
At the end of the day
Tomorrow never comes.
User avatar
Golem
 

Re: Takamine B10

Postby Golem » Fri Jan 04, 2008 12:31 pm

`
Just to be perfickly clear, the B10 is not a unique design. It's just the only production model large archtop bass gu1tar. If you got between 6K and 10K Yanqui USA Gringo Greenbacks, there are other options. Both the basses below appear to have "jazz gu1tar" type mini magnetic PUs at the neck, but I gotta believe that for the price, if you want piezo, or both, or inner mics, or whatever .......

Bill_Moll_archtop.jpg
Bill_Moll_archtop.jpg (44.74 KiB) Viewed 2364 times


Tom_Ribbecke_Archtop.jpg
Tom_Ribbecke_Archtop.jpg (11.83 KiB) Viewed 2363 times

And here's where I swope the pix: http://www.luthiersaccessgroup.com/bassesinstock.html


Money can't buy happiness, but lack of money can buy a lotta frustration. I am very lucky to have found the B10. The basses above are from a completely different fiscal galaxy than the one where I hang out.

`

New basses are red. Used basses are black.
- - ---- -- - --- - - - --- - ---- -- - - --- - -- - -

In a perfect world
At the end of the day
Tomorrow never comes.
User avatar
Golem
 


Return to HOLLOWBODY



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest